Grow trust for organisational excellence

  1. Make people feel safe — guarding a person’s safety and ensuring a person’s survival seem to be top priorities for the brain. A leader who can demonstrate non-threatening behaviour patterns and evenness in communication will more likely be viewed as trustworthy.
  2. Demonstrate fairness — leaders should treat people as individuals, but ensure that fairness characterises every approach. The brain seeks fairness and reacts to perceived injustice with anger and frustration.
  3. Be genuine and extend trust to others — Meacham notes: “When we watch someone else, our brains are activated in the same way that the brain of the person we are observing is activated — through the function of special ‘mirror neurons’. So, if a person distrusts the person with whom they are speaking, the other person will pick up on this and mirror that distrust back”.

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Jonathan Mills

Jonathan Mills

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Jonathan has spent over 30 years focusing his efforts on developing people throughout the world. He believes that people have the most impact when stretched.