Creating constructive teamwork

Much has been documented with respect to team success or failure. High-performance teams, upon evaluation of performance characteristics, seem to have that “special something” that drives their achievements. Their reputation grows and every success seems to inspire further greatness. They “win” nine times out of ten and use any failure as a springboard to learn, re-evaluate behaviour and refine their focus. They always take responsibility for their actions and are valued highly.

Teams that just don’t seem to make the grade and that frequently don’t live up to expectations, however, are characterised by blame, a lack of initiative and frequent bouts of infighting. Morale is low and focus is diffused. Energy is applied to protecting one’s back and behaviour is governed by suspicion and fear. These teams seem to fail for one or more of the following reasons:

  • A lack of clarity with regard to vision, purpose and goals — having unclear priorities is the foremost reason for team failure.

Creating constructive teamwork requires a focus on ten effectiveness factors, all of which, when in place, combine to give birth to that “special something” that gets the team to winning status:

  1. Goals — everyone knows, agrees to and implements the goals

Creating constructive teamwork necessitates great leadership. Casey Stengel noted: “It’s easy to get good players. Getting them to play together, that’s the hard part”. Armed with a compelling vision, emotional intelligence, great communication and coaching skills, the leader will be able to focus the combined efforts of the individual players into energised execution.

Originally published at https://www.stretchforgrowth.com on November 6, 2015.

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Jonathan has spent over 30 years focusing his efforts on developing people throughout the world. He believes that people have the most impact when stretched.

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Jonathan Mills

Jonathan has spent over 30 years focusing his efforts on developing people throughout the world. He believes that people have the most impact when stretched.